3
$\begingroup$

When reading a paper, I came across the following statement

Standard vectors were constructed, flanked by pairs of homology sequences derived from yeast barcodes at the ends of each expression cassette. We reasoned that as these barcode sequences were designed to be orthogonal, they could serve a dual purpose of reducing the probability of mis-annealing and dictating the assembly order of multiple cassettes.

I am not sure what the "orthogonal" means here. I think it is about synthetic biology.

$\endgroup$
6
  • $\begingroup$ Could you please put your question in contact? What is the reason for asking? How does this relate to your research area? Otherwise Google it $\endgroup$
    – M__
    Oct 22 '19 at 6:12
  • $\begingroup$ Could you be referring to orthologous? We can't answer this without more context. $\endgroup$
    – terdon
    Oct 22 '19 at 12:02
  • $\begingroup$ You are talking about synthetic biology, right? If you mean the orthogonal Shine-Dalgano sequences, it depends on the system and all are experimental and not as established as Amber supression codons. See wiki $\endgroup$ Oct 22 '19 at 16:57
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thank you all very much! When I read a paper, it says, "Standard vectors were constructed, flanked by pairs of homology sequences derived from yeast barcodes at the ends of each expression cassette. We reasoned that as these barcode sequences were designed to be orthogonal, they could serve a dual purpose of reducing the probability of mis-annealing and dictating the assembly order of multiple cassettes." I am not sure what the "orthogonal" means here. I think it is about synthetic biology. Thanks! $\endgroup$ Oct 25 '19 at 3:47
  • $\begingroup$ Orthogonal in that case means what it means normally. Namely, different enough to not cross-talk. Say A interacts with a and B with b, but A does not with b. If A did interact with b, it would not be orthogonal but it be non-orthogonal/cross-talking/cross-reaction (if chemical). $\endgroup$ Dec 3 '19 at 9:48
1
$\begingroup$

Orthogonal DNA sequences are the shortest possible single stranded nucleotide stretches constructed. These sequences are used as probes in DNA hybridization. Because of its length and construction it has least chance of binding with other probes.

This technique improves the efficacy and specificity and is clinically used to detect genetic disorders in shortest time duration.

Via: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep24650

https://www.pnas.org/content/106/7/2289

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you! @Twinkle Sheen $\endgroup$ Dec 6 '19 at 4:26
  • $\begingroup$ Please upvote if you found it useful :) $\endgroup$ Dec 6 '19 at 4:46
  • $\begingroup$ No problem! I have upvoted. I was told that my vote was recorded, but it wouldn't change the publicly post score because my reputation in the system was less than 15. $\endgroup$ Dec 7 '19 at 5:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.